Congressman Mark DeSaulnier Visits East County First 5 Center to Discuss Early Screening and Intervention with Parents

 

Last week, First 5 Contra Costa was thrilled to meet with Congressman Mark DeSaulnier for a tour of the East County First 5 Center in Pittsburg, and a discussion of our “Help Me Grow” program to improve early screening and intervention. Rep. DeSaulnier is carrying a bill this year that would significantly increase federal funding for developmental services, so children in our counties and others who need help are identified sooner, and helped faster.

Far too often, children arrive at their first day of kindergarten with signs of obvious developmental, behavioral or social challenges. In many cases, this can be prevented through timely developmental screening and early intervention, one of the most important things we can do to promote children’s health in their first years. Yet only 29% of California children receive timely developmental screenings.

First 5 Contra Costa has worked hard to ensure every pediatric provider in our county uses a standard developmental screening tool at recommended intervals. The County’s 211 information and referral service now has trained developmental specialists available to navigate parents to the programs and resources their child needs. And each of our five First 5 Centers—including the one Rep. DeSaulnier visited–has regular developmental playgroups for children with mild to moderate delays and their parents.

But children with more intensive conditions need more intensive services, and those remain harder to access. California’s Regional Center system and school districts are not sufficiently funded to meet the needs of children with autism and other significant developmental conditions. That’s why we’re so excited about Congressman DeSaulnier’s bill.

 

 

The  bill—The Funding Early Intervention is the Right IDEA Act (HR4107)would increase funding in two parts of existing law, the Individuals with Disabilities Education ACT (IDEA), over ten years. The IDEA makes free and appropriate education available to eligible children with disabilities from birth to 21 years of age. The DeSaulnier bill would increase funding for Part C of the IDEA, which gives states early intervention funds for infants and toddlers. It would also increase funding for preschool programs serving children with disabilities. Funding levels in both of these areas have eroded to the point that per-child spending is now only about 35% what it was more than two decades ago. Every year, 1 in 4 California children is at moderate or high risk for developmental, behavioral or social delays.

In Contra Costa we’re doing all we can to meet the needs of these children, their families and communities so that every child has their chance to develop to their full potential. But to do so, we’ll need help from our state and federal governments to ensure early childhood programs are fully funded. Congressman DeSaulnier’s bill is a strong step in the right direction.

 

For more information on Congressman Mark DeSaulnier, please visit:
https://desaulnier.house.gov/

For more information on the Help Me Grow program and early intervention and screening, please visit:
https://helpmegrowcoco.org/

For more information on your local First 5 Center and upcoming programs and activities, please visit:
http://www.first5coco.org/funded-programs/first-5-centers/

2013 Highlights

HighlightsLast year was another productive year at First 5 Contra Costa.  Take a look at some of our highlights:  

1. We continued to serve very low-income families. In a survey of 3,000 families new to our services, nearly half (46%) earned less than $15,000 last year. Most of the children had health insurance, with 70% enrolled in Medi-Cal. Thirty-five percent of mothers did not have a high school diploma.

2. More children are receiving developmental screening. Our funded programs provided developmental screening for 1,560 children. Of these, one in five had a possible developmental delay and needed additional assessments. Our Family Survey revealed that 24% of parents were concerned their child was not developing on track.

3. Child behavior problems and parental stress decreased. Mental health therapeutic services were provided to 300 children experiencing serious behavioral problems. These services helped reduce aggressive behavior, attention problems, depression, and anxiety among participating children. Parents completing Triple P parenting workshops reported the classes reduced child behavior problems, helped them to set effective limits, and decreased their stress, anxiety and depression. Continue reading